Justice Fifth Spirit Tarot
Tarot

Justice in Love

Admittedly, I “huh?“-ed when I pulled the Justice card as a part of my self-love tarot spread last week. My question was:

“What is the one kind thing I can do as an act of love for myself?”

Alas, I let them take the lead and braced myself to explore together.

The Justice in the Fifth Spirit Tarot deck is drawn as a bad ass person. I love everything about them from the expression, attitude, the down to the outfit. Did they appear to remind me of my own bad-ass-ness? To bring it out more often as an act of self-love?

I also noticed that on the scale, unlike on other Justice tarot cards I have seen ━ including the classic Rider Waite Smith, the heart weighed more than the feather. (I can’t wait for the guidebook to arrive to read the artist, Maria’s, reasoning behind this).

Justice Fifth Spirit Tarot

Are they trying to convey that heart matters more than the mind? Is it asking me to listen more to my heart instead of my mind when it comes to self-love? Or is it reminding me to balance it out since I tend to operate the other way around?

Wille of A Little Spark of Joy tarot blog said this about the Justice card in relation to love:

(it) represents decision and choices. Do you know your worth? settling for far less than you deserve, whether single or committed, is never an option.

Well said!

Back to the card I pulled, my attention kept going to the tattoos covering their upper body. Maybe my self-love act can be of getting the evil-eye tattoo on the same part of my body. And that my friends, is what I call wishful thinking.

Standard
Four of Wands Fifth Spirit Tarot Deck
Tarot

At Home With The Four of Wands

We are looking for the Four of Wands“, Glenys the tarot reader told me as she laid out the black cloth with numbered boxes painted on it. She went on saying that:

“The Four of Wands is the card that indicates anything house related”.

Back home, after the unfavorable reading, I flipped through the Fifth Spirit Tarot deck on my nightstand to find the Four of Wands card.

It took me a while as the card didn’t resemble the classic Rider Waite Smith. In the RWS the Four of Wands potrayed fancy gown wearing people, garlands, grapes, flowers and a castle in the background.

There was none of it on the Four of Wands card that I was holding. There were no wands. Oil lamps have replaced the wands, surrounding a vintage cooker. Burning fire. A boiling kettle and a sizzling pan on top of it.

Could it be… breakfast food?

The image reminded me of the mornings in the Echuca farmhouse, where I was greeted by a very similar scene in the kitchen — of Fafa making us coffee and breakfast.

This card carries so much more home-ey vibe for me than the classic RWS. After all, I don’t envision a castle when I dream of my nest, but more of being greeted by a warm home-cooked meal.

I put the card on my altar for the day, to attract the new home energy that I wish for.

Standard
The Chariot Moon Void Tarot The Spacious Tarot
Tarot

Flights, Chariot, Action!

I pulled the Eight of Wands and The Chariot (Cancer) as the cards of the day. It wasn’t a surprise. It has been a tradition of mine to travel on the 26 January; even before I moved to Australia, which has it as the first public holiday of the year.

This time though, what caught my attention was The Chariot card.

Along with The Magician, The Chariot was one of the first few tarot cards that I liked and understood. Or so I thought.

When I first started learning tarot based on the images, I associated The Chariot with travelling. Obviously, as the guy on the classic Rider Waite Smith tarot deck is riding a chariot. He is on the move or about to move. So is the witch who is riding the bike on the Everyday Witch Tarot deck.

But the Chariot on the deck I used for the reading today, the Moon Void Tarot, shows pages and pages of papers. Each one dated by month. July 2016, August 2016 and so on. There is a hand holding a pen writing on one of those pages. As if the person is scheduling and making plans. I don’t see anything that resembles travelling, which ironically fitted my situation of being unable to travel this time.

Alas, it got me curious about the artist’s interpretation of the card, and I dug through my piles of to-read books and found the guide book for the deck which I bought separately (one of the best tarot related decision I made so far: When in doubt, get the guide book). It says:

“…connect with our momentum, as we develop a clear vision, we begin to take action. …daily practice becomes the structure that takes us from one phase of life to the next. Small steps in physical reality will be met by large leaps from the Universe, but first, (you) must begin.”

I then went through The Spacious Tarot deck wondering how The Chariot is depicted there as I don’t think I have ever pulled this card from that deck. The image on the card itself reminded me of the Milford Sound in New Zealand South Island. Again travel related. But the mini-guide book offered an explanation closer to one given by the Moon Void above:

“…define exactly what is it that you want to do. What hard things do you need to do at this time? Affirm that you are capable and go do what you need to do.”

Wow. Reading it was like peeling another layer of The Chariot card.

The one that I didn’t even know existed.

The one about taking inspired actions.

I love it when that happens. That is also why I am love learning about tarot. The more I understand, the more interesting it becomes.

🛒 ❥K

Standard
Film Camera MjuII Kodak Ektar 100 Nine of Pentacles The Moon Void Tarot
Tarot

Channeling The Lady of Leisure with Nine of Pentacles

I had never given much interest on Nine of Pentacles until one day I saw it on This Might Hurt Tarot deck and read the description on the booklet. Then and here it’s crystallized in my mind that I want to be the lady in the Nine of Coins. That’s the energy I want to emulate in my life.

I started looking at other the Nine of Pentacles to see the different interpretations offered by other tarot decks. In the classic Rider Waite Smith tarot deck, the Nine of Pentacles drawn as a lady in a robe holding a pet bird on her finger. It’s well, pretty irrelevant, which might be why the card never caught my attention before. But in This Might Hurt Tarot deck, it’s depicted as a girl reading a book in a garden.

I can relate to this image so much! It’s what my dream life looks like, precisely what I want to do in my leisure days.

Standard
Seven of Wands Tarot Moon Void Tarot Crystals
Tarot

The Spacious Seven of Wands

With space as the guiding word for my year, I went through my tarot-mental Rolodex, to pick a card, which best represents space for me.

Not able to associate the space I have in mind with any major arcana cards (not even The Fool nor The World), I moved to the minor ones in sequence starting from the Wands suit. It was then it clicked, without needing to review the rest of the cards on the deck – the space energy I wish to invite for this year is represented in the Seven of Wands.

TBR, the Seven of Wands has never been a favorite – both as a Seven (I prefer Seven of Pentacles) nor in the Wands suit (I favor the Eight of Wands). It’s also the only Seven suits that I haven’t journal-ed about as I had never put much thought into it, until this week.

Also, the image of the card in the classic Rider Waite Smith deck is not pretty. It shows a man, with mismatched shoes, standing on a higher ground, ready to fight other wands pointing at him. But then, when I envision conquering 2021 by claiming my space, I so want to be that man. Ready to defend my place, come what may!

In tarot, Seven of Wands traditionally means courage, persistence, competition, challenges. It can also be about:

Perseverance, defending one’s territory and expansion which for me translates to space, space and more space.

Space Word of the year 2021 Echuca Farm Stay Melbourne Victoria Australia
Standard
The Nine of Swords Depression Moon Void Tarot
Tarot

The Depressing Nine of Swords

I pulled Nine of Swords from the Moon Void Tarot deck today on my last working day of 2020.

Though it might be unusual to pull the gloomiest card on the tarot deck a couple of days before Christmas, I wasn’t surprised at all. I have anticipated my workday would be hell, and it was. Alas, it’s done now, and I don’t even want to think let alone elaborate about it anymore.

Let’s talk about the Nine of Swords itself. A card that dominated the year 2020 collectively ━ at least for most of us ━ included me during the large-part of #isolife.

The Nine of Swords is a card of sadness, depression, despair, helplessness, and inability to escape reality.

Whenever I pull the Nine of Swords, especially as a stand-alone card say as a card to describe my day, I feel like the air around me has been sucked and making me unable to breathe normally.

As I shared here before that I am not deterred when I pulled The Moon, The Death even The Tower card but Nine of Swords always want me to shove the card back into the deck, take a nap to restart my day and redo the reading.

There is no two-way about it, the Nine of Swords put a fear in me.

Aside to the depressive general interpretation of the card above, the image of it is also unpleasant.

The traditional Rider Waite Smith tarot deck depicts the Nine of Swords as a girl crying alone in her bedroom. Eek!

Also, I don’t particularly appreciate that on the most tarot deck I have seen, the Nine of Swords, if it has a person on it, is usually shown as a woman instead of a man. As if depression, crying and showing vulnerable emotions are more of a woman thing. It’s not. It’s universal. Let’s change the narrative!

Yes, I am sure the Nine of Swords also has some redeemable qualities about it and like all the card in the tarot deck, is here to guide and or teach us something. Maybe I can start a quest on Nine of Swords. An in-depth study on it so I can understand better and learn from it. But for now, I am just glad this card comes to me very rarely, and if it’s a stand-alone or where I wouldn’t want it to be the likely outcome or solution, I usually pull a clarifying card to ease up the pain of the many, MANY, swords.

Standard
Waxing Moon Morning Sky Mjuii x Fujifilm Industrial 100
Tarot

Shedding Some Light on The Moon

“What is your association with The Moon card?”

My tarot teacher asked me when we practiced reading tarot with a spread.

I told her that:

“I always feel a strong connection to the moon. I also find The Moon card on most tarot decks attractive”.

She seemed a bit relieved by my answer, before going on explaining that tarot readers have divided perceptions about The Moon card; some consider it as a good card, while others find it difficult.

I looked at the card on the spread. We were using the Rider Waite Smith tarot deck. There a few things going on for sure. The lobster, the howling dogs, the towers with the dark sky draping the background. But nothing calls out to be as a problematic.

Yes, the moon can be emotional, but so are we, are we not?

I put my thoughts aside and continued reading the spread. I interpreted The Moon as I needed to wait for a whole month before being able to see any progress.


The Moon card (Pisces) itself is about intuition.

The Moon


It’s time to let the moon illuminate our dark side. For us to embrace our shadow-self, to go deeper inside, in the effort of understanding ourselves better.


The other day, I meditated under the full moon on Aries. Again a homework from my teacher. I took out all The Moon cards my all the tarot decks (excluding Rider Waite Smith tarot deck, as these days I only use it as a point of reference) I owned to contemplate more on it.

The depiction in The Spacious Tarot deck is my favourite. The card is dominated by a large moon – which reminds me of the time I went to Uluru and saw the moon up close point. It also has two mushrooms on it, which reminds me of The Lovers tarot card.

After spending sometime with The Moon tarot cards, I journaled about it – a whole three pages in my Moleskin. I am not ready to share it here yet. Thought at this rate, I have a feeling that I will eventually share it with you but for now, do know it has been cathartic.

That night, I honoured the moon’s energy by drinking Lavender tea and going to bed with Selenite charging me from the bedside table.

Standard
Tarot

Ten of Pentacles and The Introvert

I have always associated the Ten of Pentacles with family.

From having a family gathering, throwing a party and inviting your family or at the least celebrating the fact of having made it in life seen from your family or community standard. Those are pretty close to the traditional interpretation of the Ten of Pentacles: financial security, family, legacy and stability (for me, stability relates closely to family).

In the classic Rider Waite Smith tarot deck, the Ten of Pentacles depicted by three generations sitting in the courtyard with a castle in the background. It shows prosperity — excessively.

Echoing a few tarot readers sentiments, I too have a qualm with the classic image of the card. Firstly, why there is only an older man? If it’s of three generations, where is the older woman? Did she die? Why the young-ish couple’s body language doesn’t exude warmness? Why are they being showered by the coins? Are they purposely flaunting their wealth? If yes, yikes! And lastly:

If it’s a family celebration, where is the food??

Btw, I haven’t done deep-dive study nor worked enough with the Ten of Pentacles, but these are the questions that keep coming up when I see the Ten of Pentacles in Rider Waite Smith tarot deck.

Whenever I pull the Ten of Pentacles, the introvert in me paused. Yes, yay for a good-omen card! Yay, for completion but…

What if I don’t feel like celebrating with people today?

Because sometimes – well, most of the times – a celebration for me involves some me-time. I also most likely treat myself first as a reward for having tick-off my goals or having “made-it”. And those activities carry more of the Nine of Pentacles’s energy than the next card in the deck.

It also makes me wonder whether it means introverts journey stops at the Nine of Pentacles just because that’s where our happy place is? That doesn’t seem fair, does it?? After all, we also work as hard as our more social counterparts. We also deserve to obtain the 10th coin, but you know, in our own terms.

So you can imagine my delight when I saw the Moon Void Tarot deck depiction of Ten of Pentacles – which I draw during my morning ritual. The Ten of Pentacles here is seen from the vantage point of the slightly opened gates (adorned by carvings of pentacles), in front of it laid a beautifully tended garden leading to the front door of a house (more of a bungalow than a house, it’s Ten of Pentacles after all).

All tens are about completion, and the introvert in me relate more entering my own home at the end of a very eventful ten cards worth of journey instead of partying it up with the extended family in the piazza flashing our wealth to all the passersby.

Also, it’s nice to think that the Moon Void Tarot deck gave the choice of what’s-behind-the-door entirely to us. It can be just Netflix and stacks of books, or your cat, or your just partner or your entire family waiting for you to share a meal, or a coven of witches, heck even a full-on party. Giving the nod to your perception of “family”.

As for the interpretation of the card in regards to my day today? Well, it was pretty straight forward, we accepted a last-minute invite to our friends’ home for a cozy evening gathering. There was plenty of food.

Standard
Tarot

Four of Cups: Withdrawal As A Self Care

Today for my daily tarot card, I pulled the Four of Cups — along with a few others that tag along.

Though I have drawn this card before during my daily tarot practice, it still is a rare card for me. Unlike say the Six of Swords being one of the cards that tagged the Four of Cups earlier.

I tried to remember a few keywords from the traditional meaning — apathy, withdrawal or ignorance.

And it took me some time to see the connection thread between the card in the classic Rider Waite Smith tarot deck — where a man looks away, intentionally or unintentionally, from the cups given to him — compared to the one in the Spacious Tarot deck — depicted by four cups sitting on a rock in the middle of moving stream. In both cards the cups are standing still while the world around them keeps moving.

Meanwhile, the Spacious Tarot deck guidebook says:

Although it can indicate sulkiness, it can also suggest a need for emotional stability. Is your heart asking you to temporarily disengage so you can return to your own center?

These words made it click for me.

As a trained first aid at work, we are taught and always being reminded to debrief after assisting a causality. We are asked to check in with ourselves and do at least one of the tried and tested self-care activities of our choice.

These past few days have been hard. Being only a couple weeks away from the end of the financial year and so close to Christmas break, my attention has been required more and multiple times. Both at work and socially. It all has gotten a bit too much for an introvert like me. But instead of taking time to debrief myself, I tried to bulldoze my way through the week with multiple cups of coffee (ironically 4 cups yesterday) before crashing on the bed immediately after I log-off from the work laptop, shower and confirm the rest of the world doesn’t need my assistance for the day.

In short, I have neglected to fill my own cup as I have been too busy filing others’.

I guess that’s why this rare to me card appeared. As a reminder to take care of myself first before others.

As someone who usually sees Four of Cups simple as the ignorance card, it is interesting to learn this side of it. This time, it managed to teach me that:

Withdrawing from the world to fill my own cup can be a good thing.

Standard
The Hermit Tarot
Tarot

An Evening with The Hermit

I have the apartment for myself this evening. Earlier, I counted the last time I had the place for myself for more than an hour or so. It was pre-lockdown, which coincidentally was during my redundancy months. It was almost a year ago. Far too long, no thanks to Covid.

“The solitary evening must be celebrated”

the Virgo in me has spoken.

I took a long hot shower and poured myself a tall glass of chilled Moscato. It was the only bottle left from the eight bottles we bought last month in preparation for Christmas celebration. Pinning the thought that I might be a fully functioning alcoholic aside, I put the cookie dough on the tray into the oven. Yes, it might be a weird choice to combine cheap chilled Moscato and chocolate chips cookies on a summer evening, but those things bring me joy.

After putting Final Destination 2 as the background noise and while waiting for the oven to make the “DING” sound, I took out all my tarot deck. Tonight we party! Well, not all of us, as I only invited the Hermit from each deck.

The thing is, even though I claimed to be an introvert and a through-and-through

who need their space and me-time, I have yet to connect with The Hermit card. I have yet to sit and meditate, let alone journal with them. And I guess today is a good day as any to connect the archetype that I am all too familiar with.

Traditionally, The Hermit is about taking some time to contemplate, solitude, isolation, introspection, me-time and carving some space for oneself. With those characteristics attach to them, the Hermit can be seen as well harmless at their best and dull at their worst. It’s not without reasons. The Hermit is a not threatening card. None fear them in a reading. But at the same time , The Hermit card doesn’t scream good luck either. Well to be fair, The Hermit doesn’t scream for anything.

Even for a yes-no question, The Hermit won’t give you a resounding answer immediately. They will need to contemplate the question first, for some time — preferably alone in the dark. Before coming up with, what they think as, a well thought answer.

They can be border lining with boring those Hermits, but let me ask you this:

What can be a better card to represent our collective 2020 experience if not the Hermit?

It’s the epitome of the lockdown, confinement, isolation — both self-imposed or forced.

Back to the Hermits that I laid on the table — I could see a thread that connects them all, from the classic Rider Waite Smith tarot deck to The Light Seer’s Tarot deck, the lantern.

In The Spacious Tarot deck, The Hermit is depicted as a lantern, brightening the dark woods with its’ light. The guidebook says this about the tree in the woods: “they offer a clearing, a sacred space for you to reconnect with yourself.”

Refreshingly, in both This Might Hurt Tarot and The Numinous Tarot decks, the cards are drawn as feminine figures. Though their faces are hidden (typical The Hermit), the long grey-hair and the shapely coats indicate their womanhood.

In This Might Hurt Tarot deck, the woman is holding a lantern illuminating a dark snowy night. It’s beautiful. I also love Isabella Rotman’s parting message regarding the card. She said:

“It doesn’t mean that you need to rent a cabin in the woods and throw your cellphone in a river. You just need to withdraw enough to listen to yourself.”

And I will do just that right after this with a book companied by a plate of freshly baked cookies, another generous serving of Moscato. I wish you a lovely start of the weekend!

Standard